Crude now faces uncertainty in demand after record rise

Crude now faces uncertainty in demand after record rise

Oil had registered the highest monthly rise, just a few weeks after prices fell sharply below zero. In May, Crude fell around 88 percent, and on Friday, for the first time since March, US futures toped $3 5 a barrel, powered by dramatic supply restrictions from producers across the world. Nevertheless, rates are still below year-end averages, and demand, which has been devastated by the coronavirus epidemic, may continue to demonstrate gradual progress to extend the recovery.

Consumption future looks grim right now, but it’s on the rebound. Although confines linked to coronavirus are loosening, demand in the US has not yet recovered.Sales of petrol, which have been significantly affected in European nations like Spain and Italy, will take time to recover. China is a bright spot but the rest of Asia is still suffering.

The number of drilling rigs at work in the U.S. This has deteriorated for the eleventh week, retaining the surplus oil that entered the economy. There is a possibility, however, that that oil prices may encourage producers to increase production even further. “What dominates everything at the end of the day is appetite for petrol,” said Tom O’Connor, senior director of oil markets at the  multinational consultancy ICF. “There is going to be an inherent downturn in market likely to be there for some time.”