Scientists Find Out Most Mysterious And Largest Canyon In The Solar System

Scientists Find Out Most Mysterious And Largest Canyon In The Solar System

Scientists from the University of Arizona (UA) In Tucson have discovered the single largest and most mysterious canyon in the solar system through stunning pictures. Experts have said that it is around 87 million miles above the Grand Canyon. It is a grander and massive abyss, which cuts through the gut of the Red Planet. Experts have said that it is known as Valles Marineris. It is a structure of deep and vast canyons, and it takes a sprint more than 2500 miles along with the Martian equator, it covers around a quarter of the perimeter of Mars. This cut in the bedrock of the Red Planet is nearly three times deeper and around 10 times as long as the Grand Canyon of Earth. Scientists have been able to take pictures of Mars’s strangest trait with the help of a high-resolution camera called HiRISE (High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Although experts have been able to take pictures of Valles Marineris, however, they are unsure how this gigantic canyon complex has been formed.

Scientists from UA have claimed that Valles Marineris has not been formed due to billions of years of rushing water like Earth’s Grand Canyon. They have said that the Red Planet is excessively dry and hot; therefore, it cannot accommodate a river, which is large enough to cut through the crust of the planet like that. On the other hand, scientists from the European Space Agency (ESA) have said that they have found some evidence of flowing rivers, which might have intensified some of the canyon’s current canals hundreds of millions of years ago. Scientists from ESA have said that a majority of the canyon might have been cracked open billion of years ago when a nearby super-set of volcanoes known as the Tharsis region had exploded for the first time out of the Martial soil.

The ESA has claimed that the magma would have boiled up under these massive volcanoes including Olympus Mons, which is known as the largest volcano in the solar system. It would have extended and ripped the crust of Red Planet and ultimately would have collapsed into the trenches and valleys, which make up Valles Marineris in the present time. Experts from ESA have said that there are many shreds of evidence, which prove that consequent landslides, flowing magma, and ancient rivers might have contributed to the constant erosion of the canyon on Mars over the following eons. However, the latest images taken by HiRISE might help scientists to understand the origin of the grandest canyon in the solar system.